renewable energy

If not nuclear then what? Time to reimagine the grid.

If not nuclear then what? Time to reimagine the grid.

Until recently, the UK government’s future energy plans relied heavily on expensive new nuclear power plants to provide baseload capacity as old fossil fuel plants shut down. This was also going to ensure grid stability to support increased intermittent and volatile renewable generation. However, the energy system is fundamentally changing. We don’t need expensive nuclear power to keep the lights on – a more flexible energy system will enable renewables to flourish.

The Future of Energy is Shared Technology Innovation

The Future of Energy is Shared Technology Innovation

Founder and CTO Matthew Williams will represent both Faraday Grid and LF Energy at DistribuTECH in New Orleans this year, where he will deliver a talk on why he believes an open source system is a necessary foundation for a prosperous energy future. Read this article in which Matthew explains how open source will fuel innovation in energy and find time and date for his presentation below.

Encouraging innovation in regulated utilities: consultation - response from Faraday Grid

Encouraging innovation in regulated utilities: consultation - response from Faraday Grid

The HM Treasury’s and Department for Business, Energy & Industrial Strategy (BEIS) initiated a consultation focusing on innovation in utilities, with the aim to “ensure our system of utilities regulation is fit for the future.” As an innovator of technology that will radically transform the market and with a growing global presence, Faraday Grid is keen to engage in the conversation and submitted a response to BEIS, which can be accessed here.

The Energy Trilemma is far from being resolved - Response to Greg Clark

The Energy Trilemma is far from being resolved - Response to Greg Clark

In this response to Greg Clark MP, Founder & Chief Technology Officer Matthew Williams and Chief Economist & Head of Government Affairs Richard Dowling together challenge the idea that the Energy Trilemma is “over” and examine how greater amounts of renewables will affect energy security and energy equity, should there be no change to the current grid.

Nature’s constraints need not limit innovation and growth – Part 2: Paul Romer

Nature’s constraints need not limit innovation and growth – Part 2: Paul Romer

The story of how two economists integrated innovation and climate with long term economic growth and won a Nobel prize, part 2.

How will California go Carbon Free by 2045?

How will California go Carbon Free by 2045?

In September 2018, Governor Jerry Brown made history by signing the revolutionary Senate Bill 100 (SB 100). The truly ground-breaking requirement is the stipulation for California to be 100 per cent carbon free by 2045. Achieving such an ambitious target will require innovative technological solutions. Read Oliver Forsyth’s writing on what circumstances and factors to consider.

Energy storage, variable renewables, and the path towards limiting global temperature rise

Energy storage, variable renewables, and the path towards limiting global temperature rise

Variable renewable energy (VRE) is forecast to reach 50% of total generation by 2050. To balance the inherent variability, a surge in storage technology with respect to grid power and quality is expected. The most popular technology, lithium ion battery storage does not come without its constraints. Read Peter Lo’s writing on the trends surrounding storage and variable renewable energy.

Are we far from a world where everybody drives an EV?

Are we far from a world where everybody drives an EV?

The increasing focus on renewable energy sources and low carbon technologies is triggering a substantial shift in the automotive industry. Supported by government policies and public interest, the number of electric vehicles are swiftly increasing, exceeding predictions year to year. Is the electricity system ready to cater for such a vast new demand?

Faraday Grid at the Clean Energy Summit

Faraday Grid at the Clean Energy Summit

CEO Andrew Scobie, CMO Jacqui Porch, and Director, Paul Ezekiel travelled to Sydney to represent Faraday Grid and join key players of the energy sphere at the Clean Energy Summit 2018.

New Energy Outlook - A techno-economic review

New Energy Outlook - A techno-economic review

Rapid acceleration of changes in the energy sphere renders preparations for their implicit challenges difficult. Bloomberg’s recently published 2018 New Energy Outlook (NEO) highlights key market drivers and integrates insight from a variety of experts to evaluate how the energy market will evolve in the coming decades.

From a pragmatic perspective, the electricity system will have to technologically adapt to enable these trends without inflating costs or dangerously destabilising the system. Electrical Engineer, Alex Kleidaras reviews some of the claims of NEO, with regards to their implications and requirements for their feasibility.

Faraday Grid Benefits - a New York State Viewpoint

Faraday Grid Benefits - a New York State Viewpoint

The New York State electricity grid’s challenges – similarly to other grids worldwide - derive from the fact that the current network architecture restraints the system’s ability to accommodate shifting electricity uses and generation types.

Reactive problem solving is not sufficient to sustainably provide the system flexibility such rapid changes require. It is a resilient systemic solution that is required to relieve the system from its pressures and provide an opportunity for further innovation.

Faraday Grid Ltd. (Faraday) has developed a completely new technology that provides a systemic, cost-effective solution. Read Jagadeesh Guda’s white paper that documents the techno-economic implications of the Faraday Grid technology in specific to the New York state electricity grid.

Faraday Grid’s response submission to OFGEM’s RIIO-2 Consultation

Faraday Grid’s response submission to OFGEM’s RIIO-2 Consultation

In response to OFGEM’s RIIO-2 consultation, Faraday Grid urges the incentivisation of fundamental network-wide solutions as opposed to seeking out incremental mitigating technologies providing only temporary relief from network-wide pressures.

Third-party Validation of the Faraday Exchanger

Third-party Validation of the Faraday Exchanger

The Power Network Demonstration Centre (PNDC), a smart grid demonstration and testing facility, carried out an independent third-party validation of the Faraday Exchanger. The tests carried out by PNDC reconfirmed that the Faraday Exchanger does offer the intended functionalities (voltage regulation, power-factor correction and power-quality control) that are beyond what can be provided by one single technology to utilities and end-users of electricity. This means that wide adoption of the FG technology will result in improved power quality and reliability, increased equipment lifetime, and reduced-capital investment in mitigation technologies. Employing the key findings from PNDC validation report, this whitepaper by Jagadeesh Gunda summarises the capabilities of the Faraday Grid technology.

Microgrids, Legacy Grids, and the Faraday Grid

Microgrids, Legacy Grids, and the Faraday Grid

The tenth annual Advanced Energy Conference took place in New York City to bring together influential leaders, key researchers, and policy makers from every part of the energy sector. On the opening day of the conference, Andrew Scobie, Faraday Grid CEO took stage to speak about the pioneering Faraday Grid solution, specifically, the possibilities it can open up for progressing microgrid technology. 

Reinventing electricity grids and Creating a Platform to Integrate New Technologies

Reinventing electricity grids and Creating a Platform to Integrate New Technologies

CEO, Andrew Scobie joined industry leaders at the Energy Storage and Connected Systems 2018 conference to present at a panel discussion focusing on the systemic evolution of grid operation and its relation to new technologies. The presentation analysed the current energy challenge, mitigating technologies, and the Faraday Grid's solution. 

Review of the Faraday Grid Launch Event

Review of the Faraday Grid Launch Event

The Launch Event of the Faraday Grid, including a live demonstration of the Faraday Exchanger device attracted over 150 guests from academia, science, and business. This truly unique technology is able to dramatically increase the amount of renewable energy in the grid, reduce carbon emissions and reduce the cost of energy to consumers. In this review, Richard Dowling, Chief Economist reflects on night and the implications of this groundbreaking technology. 

Frequency Control, Short Term Volatility and the Faraday Grid Solution

Frequency Control, Short Term Volatility and the Faraday Grid Solution

In the current hardware of electricity systems, the supply-demand-balance has a very important implication for maintaining the system’s frequency, which needs to be stable each second of the day for the system to function properly. Non-standard frequencies can harm both transformers and appliances in people’s homes. As the energy mix changes, the feasibility of utility-scale photovoltaics as a frequency response is an area of current interest and research. The Faraday Grid resolves short-term balancing issues by modulating power flows to reduce their noise, dynamically managing the voltage and the frequency in the electricity grid in doing so.

Electricity grids and markets: current status, problems, and opportunities for the Faraday Grid

Electricity grids and markets: current status, problems, and opportunities for the Faraday Grid

White Paper by University of Edinburgh Chancellor’s Fellow Dr Harry van der Weijde analysing the current status of electricity grids and markets considering clean energy goals. The paper finds that the current electricity system is fast approaching a breaking point and will not be able to handle higher levels of renewable energy without substantial new costs that would hit consumers.  Dr van der Weijde concludes that the Faraday Grid can resolve the challenge of increasing renewable energy penetration and preventing the looming threat of doubling or tripling of longer term electricity prices.

Modernising electricity grids: from smart grids to blockchain - and The Faraday Grid

Modernising electricity grids: from smart grids to blockchain - and The Faraday Grid

A modern grid supplying modern electricity demands should be able to provide environmentally friendly energy securely and at an affordable price at once. There are a number of technology pathways being suggested to modernise the electricity grid, and adapt it to the new reality of distributed variable renewable generation. This article gives an overview of these technologies.

Energy Explainer: Electricity Markets

Energy Explainer: Electricity Markets

In order to explain how the lights stay on, we first need to have a broad overview of how electrical networks work. This article gives a review of the evolution of electricity markets over the past century and explains the complex system they have become.