faraday grid

ORIGINS OF DESIGN IN ENGINEERING AND POWER SYSTEMS

STANDING ON THE SHOULDERS OF GIANTS

A BRIEF HISTORY OF DESIGN IN ENGINEERING AND POWER SYSTEMS LEADING TO THE FARADAY GRID

In every era in the history of humanity, innovation and development has been implemented in all areas to simplify the functioning of operating systems and ultimately, to increase efficiency and boost productivity. The Faraday Exchanger builds on the work of key physicists and mathematicians by going back to fundamental principles.

Innovation in the area of power and energy can be dated back to 600 BC, when Thales of Miletus, a Greek philosopher, first wrote about the concept of static electricity. He observed that if one rubbed fur on various materials, such as amber, they could create an electric spark.

Later in the 16th century, scientists such as William Gilbert, who is described by some as the father of electrical engineering, would carry out extensive research into electricity and magnetism, leading to him correctly and most significantly concluding that the earth behaves like a giant magnet.

With discoveries like these, came further findings such as Coulomb’s Law in the 18th Century. French physicist Charles-Augustin de Coulomb defined the law of electrostatic attraction and repulsion. Later in that century, Italian physicist Alessandro Volta created the first electric battery using chemicals and metals. By doing this, Volta proved that electricity could be generated chemically.

Such initial findings paved the way for Danish physicist and chemist Hans Christian Oersted who was the first person to ascertain the relationship between electricity and magnetism. He discovered this by proving that electric currents affected compass needles and created magnetic fields.

Following this, French physicist André-Marie Ampère found that current carrying wires produce forces on each other. He stated that two parallel portions of a circuit would attract one another if the currents in them flowed in the same direction and vice versa.

At the same time, Michael Faraday, one of the most influential scientists in history, was credited with inventing the first electric motor. Following Oersted’s discovery of electromagnetism, Faraday constructed two devices to produce an electromagnetic rotation. Faraday’s inventions and discoveries of electromagnetic induction and the laws of electrolysis have paved the way for inventions such as the modern electric motor, electric generators and transformers as we know them today.

By summarizing and amalgamating the findings of Coulomb, Oersted, Ampère and Faraday, a scientist named James Clerk Maxwell produced four equations that are used today as the basis of electromagnetic theory. He showed that electricity flows through many metals due to the movement of electrons amongst the atoms of the metal. The movement of these electrons produces a magnetic field, the strength of which depends on the number of moving electrons.

These studies and findings have made possible the design and manufacture of the systems that underpin modern life. However, despite the accelerated global development of the past century, the technology in use based on these findings has not fundamentally changed since the invention of the transformer by William Stanley in 1885.  

This lack of cardinal development means that today’s power systems would not be able to cope with the increasing global energy requirements without further increasing greenhouse gas emissions.

Therefore, based on these fundamentals of physics, theory from several academic streams, and using the principles of Artificial Intelligence and network optimisation, The Faraday Grid was designed to eventually replace existing technology and address the world’s global energy problem.

Introducing the energy system of the future to Washington DC

Introducing the energy system of the future to Washington DC

Our society has great aspirations for the future. As progress accelerates in every area of our lives, so does the energy system – the very underpinning of our economy – transition as well. However, an energy future shaped by evolving innovation cannot be not be realized while relying on a grid that is fundamentally no longer fit-for-purpose. On March 28 we introduced our vision for the energy system of the future to the American people. Watch our videos of the event here.

If not nuclear then what? Time to reimagine the grid.

If not nuclear then what? Time to reimagine the grid.

Until recently, the UK government’s future energy plans relied heavily on expensive new nuclear power plants to provide baseload capacity as old fossil fuel plants shut down. This was also going to ensure grid stability to support increased intermittent and volatile renewable generation. However, the energy system is fundamentally changing. We don’t need expensive nuclear power to keep the lights on – a more flexible energy system will enable renewables to flourish.

Blockchain and energy – a solution looking for a problem to solve?

Blockchain and energy – a solution looking for a problem to solve?

Blockchain has been a buzzword in many industries over the last couple of years, including the energy sector. However, despite best intentions, blockchain for energy continues to struggle to get beyond the hype and provide any real benefit. Instead, it adds complexity to the electricity system rather than solving the critical systemic challenge to provide people with clean, reliable and low cost power – the energy ‘trilemma’. Ready Founder & Chief Technology Officer Matthew Williams’s article that originally appeared on Current+.

Reinventing the Electricity Grid for Continuing Prosperity and Innovation

Reinventing the Electricity Grid for Continuing Prosperity and Innovation

The European Utility Week, a summit for key players in the energy sphere working towards a fully integrated and interconnected electricity system and market in Europe took place in Vienna this year. Read CEO Andrew’s Scobie’s speech on why the Faraday Grid is the necessary evolution of the energy system.

Prosperity, Academia, and the Faraday Grid Prize for Research for Industry

Prosperity, Academia, and the Faraday Grid Prize for Research for Industry

Last week, Founder and Chief Technology Officer Matthew Williams travelled to the University of Manchester to award the first ever Faraday Grid Prize for Research for Industry. This prize recognises rigorous academic research with strong industrial applicability. It is also a great example of Faraday’s drive to enable collaboration among the academic and private sector thereby catalysing societal progress. Read Matthew’s article below to find out why he believes collaboration is a key pillar for building future prosperity.

Faraday Grid presentation at NEIS 2018

Faraday Grid presentation at NEIS 2018

Faraday Grid is proud to be an active contributor of groundbreaking research for the energy community. Senior Engineer, Jagadeesh Gunda recently presented some of his original findings at the Conference on Sustainable Energy Supply and Energy Storage Systems – NEIS 2018 in Hamburg.

Energy storage, variable renewables, and the path towards limiting global temperature rise

Energy storage, variable renewables, and the path towards limiting global temperature rise

Variable renewable energy (VRE) is forecast to reach 50% of total generation by 2050. To balance the inherent variability, a surge in storage technology with respect to grid power and quality is expected. The most popular technology, lithium ion battery storage does not come without its constraints. Read Peter Lo’s writing on the trends surrounding storage and variable renewable energy.

Faraday Grid at the Clean Energy Summit

Faraday Grid at the Clean Energy Summit

CEO Andrew Scobie, CMO Jacqui Porch, and Director, Paul Ezekiel travelled to Sydney to represent Faraday Grid and join key players of the energy sphere at the Clean Energy Summit 2018.

Resolution of Voltage Swells by the Faraday Exchanger

Resolution of Voltage Swells by the Faraday Exchanger

Voltage swells can disrupt the operation of various equipment, ranging from consumer electronic devices and sensitive medical apparatus to a production/process-line of a manufacturing plant, leading to millions of dollars of industrial revenue loss. Current mitigating technologies are limited to specific power quality problems, and their wide adoption would be economically unsustainable. Faraday Grid Limited (Faraday) has developed an entirely new technology [3], the Faraday Exchanger – a single device, which comprehensively resolves most power quality problems and fits seamlessly into the existing infrastructure. To demonstrate the voltage swell-resolution capability of the Faraday Exchanger compared to a transformer, the Faraday team conducted laboratory experiments. For a thorough review and analysis, read this white paper. 

A journey through the world of technology patents with Faraday’s Founder and CTO Matthew Williams

A journey through the world of technology patents with Faraday’s Founder and CTO Matthew Williams

Faraday’s intellectual property is integral to building the energy platform of the future. The recent publication of some of Faraday’s original patents was a significant milestone that provided additional external validation of the authenticity of the technology.  

To understand the specifics, I asked Matthew Williams, founder and Chief Technology Officer, for an introduction to the process of patent writing, Faraday’s strategic approach, and the unique technology covered by Faraday’s published patents.

Faraday Grid Benefits - a New York State Viewpoint

Faraday Grid Benefits - a New York State Viewpoint

The New York State electricity grid’s challenges – similarly to other grids worldwide - derive from the fact that the current network architecture restraints the system’s ability to accommodate shifting electricity uses and generation types.

Reactive problem solving is not sufficient to sustainably provide the system flexibility such rapid changes require. It is a resilient systemic solution that is required to relieve the system from its pressures and provide an opportunity for further innovation.

Faraday Grid Ltd. (Faraday) has developed a completely new technology that provides a systemic, cost-effective solution. Read Jagadeesh Guda’s white paper that documents the techno-economic implications of the Faraday Grid technology in specific to the New York state electricity grid.

Energy Disruptors Unite 2018: Andrew Scobie presents GRID 2.0 The Electricity Grid - Reset, Re-Balanced…Re-Imagined

Energy Disruptors Unite 2018: Andrew Scobie presents GRID 2.0 The Electricity Grid - Reset, Re-Balanced…Re-Imagined

Electricity systems are failing. Today’s great economic and environmental challenges cannot possibly be resolved with 19th century electricity architecture. People are being asked to constrain their ambitions to meet the limitations of energy systems. Technological advances in energy remain focused on addressing symptoms of failing electricity networks.
Faraday Grid seeks to build systems from first principles rather than precedent. The fundamental objective is the delivery of cheap, clean and reliable electricity.

Third-party Validation of the Faraday Exchanger

Third-party Validation of the Faraday Exchanger

The Power Network Demonstration Centre (PNDC), a smart grid demonstration and testing facility, carried out an independent third-party validation of the Faraday Exchanger. The tests carried out by PNDC reconfirmed that the Faraday Exchanger does offer the intended functionalities (voltage regulation, power-factor correction and power-quality control) that are beyond what can be provided by one single technology to utilities and end-users of electricity. This means that wide adoption of the FG technology will result in improved power quality and reliability, increased equipment lifetime, and reduced-capital investment in mitigation technologies. Employing the key findings from PNDC validation report, this whitepaper by Jagadeesh Gunda summarises the capabilities of the Faraday Grid technology.

Microgrids, Legacy Grids, and the Faraday Grid

Microgrids, Legacy Grids, and the Faraday Grid

The tenth annual Advanced Energy Conference took place in New York City to bring together influential leaders, key researchers, and policy makers from every part of the energy sector. On the opening day of the conference, Andrew Scobie, Faraday Grid CEO took stage to speak about the pioneering Faraday Grid solution, specifically, the possibilities it can open up for progressing microgrid technology. 

Bringing Faraday Grid’s energy solutions to the U.S. market

Bringing Faraday Grid’s energy solutions to the U.S. market

Faraday Grid is ramping up its U.S. activities this week as we present at the tenth annual Advanced Energy Conference (AEC) taking place in New York City in addition to meeting potential future partners. Our presence is part of a Scottish Development International ‘Mission and Learning Journey’ delegation that seeks to bring high-value, innovative solutions to companies and organisations in the U.S. market. Richard Dowling, Chief Economist and Head of Government Affairs outlines the benefits the Faraday Grid can bring to New York and the world.

Faraday Grid Benefits - High Voltage Network Simulation

Faraday Grid Benefits - High Voltage Network Simulation

WHITE PAPER ATTACHED

The secure operation of modern electricity networks is becoming an increasingly difficult task as grids continuously employ complex interconnections, intermittent non-dispatchable renewable generation, and nonlinear loads. While these actions aim to improve power system reliability and meet sustainable energy requirements, they significantly reduce the system’s fault tolerance, inertia, and damping levels. The Faraday Exchanger (FE) technology delivers key technical and economic benefits, as demonstrated through results obtained from detailed simulations on numerous electrical networks from various countries.

Low Voltage Network Simulation with the Faraday Grid

Low Voltage Network Simulation with the Faraday Grid

When rolled out across a wider system of LV networks, the Faraday Grid technology can enable a quantum shift in energy system architecture to a new decentralised, flexible and reliable system.
Three sets of simulations measuring network performance of LV networks using conventional transformers, Online Tap Changers (OLTCs), and Faraday Exchangers were carried out to demonstrate the Faraday Grid’s superior capabilities. Read the white paper describing the simulation results via the link.

Faraday Exchanger Performance on Voltage Dips

Faraday Exchanger Performance on Voltage Dips

WHITE PAPER ATTACHED

Voltage dips are the most common supply disturbances that cause interruptions in production plants.

The engineers at Faraday Grid conducted tests on RMS and instantaneous voltage signals from a conventional transformer and a Faraday Exchanger and compared the effects of a voltage dip on both signals.

Faraday Exchanger Performance Live Demonstration

Faraday Exchanger Performance Live Demonstration

Live demonstration of the Faraday Exchanger performance as unveiled at our 12 December 2017 launch event at the National Museum of Scotland. The Faraday Exchanger dynamically controls voltage, power factor and harmonics.