design

Introducing the energy system of the future to Washington DC

Introducing the energy system of the future to Washington DC

Our society has great aspirations for the future. As progress accelerates in every area of our lives, so does the energy system – the very underpinning of our economy – transition as well. However, an energy future shaped by evolving innovation cannot be not be realized while relying on a grid that is fundamentally no longer fit-for-purpose. On March 28 we introduced our vision for the energy system of the future to the American people. Watch our videos of the event here.

If not nuclear then what? Time to reimagine the grid.

If not nuclear then what? Time to reimagine the grid.

Until recently, the UK government’s future energy plans relied heavily on expensive new nuclear power plants to provide baseload capacity as old fossil fuel plants shut down. This was also going to ensure grid stability to support increased intermittent and volatile renewable generation. However, the energy system is fundamentally changing. We don’t need expensive nuclear power to keep the lights on – a more flexible energy system will enable renewables to flourish.

The Future of Energy is Shared Technology Innovation

The Future of Energy is Shared Technology Innovation

Founder and CTO Matthew Williams will represent both Faraday Grid and LF Energy at DistribuTECH in New Orleans this year, where he will deliver a talk on why he believes an open source system is a necessary foundation for a prosperous energy future. Read this article in which Matthew explains how open source will fuel innovation in energy and find time and date for his presentation below.

Response to The Institution of Engineers in Scotland Report

Response to The Institution of Engineers in Scotland Report

The Institution of Engineers in Scotland (IESIS) published a report, Engineering for Energy: A proposal for governance of the energy system.  IESIS claimed that changes to the energy supply, such as an increased amount of renewable energy onto the electrical grid, could result in “cost escalation, increased incidence of power cuts and prolonged reinstatement of supply”.  IESIS also called for the introduction of a “National Energy Authority… to ensure the provision of fit for purpose energy infrastructure.”

In response, Faraday CEO Andrew Scobie says that only radical change of the electrical grid will deliver the low carbon future we all desire, arguing that innovation, not more bureaucracy, will enable sustainable prosperity for all.  

Nature’s constraints need not limit innovation and growth – Part 2: Paul Romer

Nature’s constraints need not limit innovation and growth – Part 2: Paul Romer

The story of how two economists integrated innovation and climate with long term economic growth and won a Nobel prize, part 2.

Introducing the world’s first Faraday Grid in London

Introducing the world’s first Faraday Grid in London

The Faraday Grid is thrilled to announce the deployment of its revolutionary technology in London, one of the world’s most sophisticated electricity networks. The agreement will see the world’s first Faraday Grid utilised in a live network from early 2019 in partnership with the UK’s most innovative distribution network operator UK Power Networks, which characterised Faraday’s technology as ‘transformational.’ As the Faraday Grid expands through the rest of the UK and beyond, it promises to unlock new frontiers in innovation and underpin the sustainable welfare of generations to come.

Electricity grids and markets: current status, problems, and opportunities for the Faraday Grid

Electricity grids and markets: current status, problems, and opportunities for the Faraday Grid

White Paper by University of Edinburgh Chancellor’s Fellow Dr Harry van der Weijde analysing the current status of electricity grids and markets considering clean energy goals. The paper finds that the current electricity system is fast approaching a breaking point and will not be able to handle higher levels of renewable energy without substantial new costs that would hit consumers.  Dr van der Weijde concludes that the Faraday Grid can resolve the challenge of increasing renewable energy penetration and preventing the looming threat of doubling or tripling of longer term electricity prices.

Resilience to cyber attack and the Faraday Grid solution

Resilience to cyber attack and the Faraday Grid solution

All actors in the electricity industry are responsible for security of supply. That is to say electricity provision to the end-users, within agreed levels of continuity and quality. For years, each part of the energy supply chain - from resource extraction to generation, transmission, distribution, markets, and increasingly end use - has relied on using digital systems. The digital connectivity of electricity grids and digital trading platforms for electricity are experiencing considerable innovation. This text considers grid resilience and risks to energy and cyber security in our society.

Design by Constraint for Complex Problems

Design by Constraint for Complex Problems

Understanding a design problem by its constraints is the best way to discover new solutions

Rather than presupposing a solution based on a set of assumptions – whether they be calculated or arbitrary – Faraday Grid use DbRC, the tools of advanced simulation and data analysis to identify the optimum design of a solution.